A State-Based Initiative

National Review Online | Published on

By James C. Capretta

The federal government is a very powerful force in the health sector, but it’s not all-powerful. Large employers and the states still have a voice: They provide insurance to tens of millions of Americans, giving them some influence over the way doctors and hospitals are organized to deliver care.

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Go Forward to Gold

National Review | Published on

By John D. Mueller and Lewis E. Lehrman

**A copy of the charts included in this article can be downloaded here. A pdf copy with the charts embedded in the article can be downloaded here.**

The most disturbing aspect of the current financial crisis is that no U.S. official has correctly identified its primary cause. Experts variously attribute the economic reverses to subprime lending, derivative trading, excessive leverage, and regulation that was either too lax or too strict (take your pick), but these are symptoms rather than causes. Ignored is the main culprit: the dollar’s role as the world’s main official reserve currency. Though he almost certainly doesn’t realize it yet, President-elect Barack Obama will either set the dollar’s reserve-currency status on the path to extinction or risk becoming the next victim of what we call “the reserve-currency curse.”

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The Swedish Solution

Weekly Standard, Volume 013, Issue 26 | Published on

By James C. Capretta

Where to turn next on Social Security reform? The presumptive Republican nom-inee for president, John McCain, like President Bush, supports introducing fully funded personal accounts within the program. Still, the odds are against a push for such accounts anytime soon. Too many Republican politicians believe, rightly or wrongly, that the president’s 2005 effort hurt them in 2006.

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The Political Economy of State-Based Pensions

| Published on

By James C. Capretta

Introduction
The phenomenon of population aging will have profound consequences for governments and societies all over the world, and not just for pension systems.  Capital flows are likely to shift dramatically, as older societies sell their assets to younger ones to finance consumption in retirement.  Worldwide immigration flows may accelerate, as older, developed nations become more dependent on workers from abroad to perform jobs that cannot be filled with domestic employees alone.  The balance of geopolitical power may also shift over time, as emerging and younger powers become more dominant economically, allowing them to demand a greater say in world political affairs.

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Global Aging and Innovative Public Pension Reforms

Pensions International, May 2007 | Published on

By James C. Capretta

The phenomenon of population ageing will have profound consequences for governments and societies all over the world, and not just for pension systems.  Capital flows are likely to shift dramatically, as older societies sell their assets to younger ones to finance consumption in retirement.  Worldwide immigration flows may accelerate, as older, developed nations become more dependent on workers from abroad to perform jobs that cannot be filled with domestic employees alone.  The balance of geopolitical power may also shift over time, as emerging and younger powers become more dominant economically, allowing them to demand a greater say in world political affairs as well.

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